Burning Trees EP

by the Collection

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about

"After my first band broke up, I started to experiment with multi-tracking. It was the only way I could get the feeling back of having a band, even though I was playing by myself. The ending result was the first 'the Collection' album, 'Burning Bushes, Moving Trees'. I recorded it in my parents basement and in multiple dorm rooms between the various colleges I dropped out of during the years I was making it. And, while I was proud of the album, it still had all the characteristics of a first album: loud background noise, less than listenable vocals, terribly mixed instruments, etc.
During the time I was working on 'the Collection EP', we had started putting together a live band. At first, we were just together the recordings in a cool way live, but eventually it became an actual band. We decided to we wanted to do a few of our older songs from the first album in a way that did our live show (at the time) full justice.
So we re-recorded these songs together, our first Collection recordings as a full band, from the 2012-2013. At the same time, however, we started working on 'Ars Moriendi', and these got lost beneath the new project.
While these no longer represent how we currently sound, play, or believe as a band, they still feel like a step in our bands history, and we're excited to release these recordings as a milestone of where we've been. We hope you enjoy them"
-David Wimbish

credits

released October 16, 2012

Recorded by the Collection from 2012-2013 in Greensboro, NC.

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the Collection Greensboro, North Carolina

The banjo-keys-glock-strings-brass-woodwinds-timpani-boy/girl-vocals-etc. of David Wimbish’s Greensboro collective may at first recall the figurine-songs of Sufjan Stevens – but only until one of the 12-member band’s delirious crescendos erupts. Wimbish employs as many as 20 instruments per track, yet the arrangements are judicious when they need to be- Shuffle Magazine ... more

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